About Arrowhead

Founded in 1945, Arrowhead is a private, non-profit, non-sectarian treatment facility serving at-risk youth aged 12-21.  Services are open to adolescents regardless of race, color, or national origin.  Arrowhead is located in a rural setting just outside of Coal Valley, Illinois, only a few miles from the Quad Cities metropolitan area.

Arrowhead's mission is to motivate youth-at-risk to become productive and responsible young people by providing the highest quality counseling, education, and social services to youth and their families.

Arrowhead is funded through payments for the adolescents' care by placement agencies and through donations and grants. Placement agencies pay a per diem (daily) rate that covers the expense of providing care for each resident.

History

In the mid 1940's, community leaders became concerned that troubled boys placed outside of their own homes were having to leave the area for other parts of the state. It was thought that the boys would be better served if a facility was opened in Rock Island County, and the Rock Island County Boys Farm School opened its doors in 1945.  The facility was a large farmhouse on a 250-acre dairy farm owned by the county, and the Farm School also rented and operated another 180 acres of farmland.

In 1958, the facility changed its name to Arrowhead and became an independent, non-profit child care agency.  In the late 1960's, Arrowhead officials conducted a fund drive to raise money to relocate to the adjacent property.  In 1970, Arrowhead added dormitories, a school, a gymnasium, an industrial arts building, a swimming pool, and a chapel.  These additions enabled Arrowhead to serve more youth, and enrollment grew.  Today, Arrowhead is currently licensed to serve 50.

Arrowhead completed construction of a physical education center in October of 1992 and completed renovation of the old gymnasium into an Education Center two years later.  A Medicaid program was implemented at Arrowhead in May of 1994.  In January 1999, renovations were completed to a farmhouse located on Arrowhead's grounds, converting the single dwelling home into an extended aftercare facility for a maximum of 12 residents.  In 2002, the William E. Nelson Memorial Automotive Repair Program began operation. In 2004, Arrowhead opened its doors to girls.

Today, Arrowhead enjoys a reputation as a successful residential treatment facility that has helped hundreds of youths and their families.